Readiness exercise provides valuable training

Airmen prepare to enter a zone transition control point during a readiness exercise at the 167th Airlift Wing, West Virginia Air National Guard, Feb. 3.

Airmen prepare to enter a zone transition control point during a readiness exercise at the 167th Airlift Wing, West Virginia Air National Guard, Feb. 3.

MARTINSBURG, W.Va. --

The 167th Airlift Wing, West Virginia Air National Guard, conducted a readiness exercise here, Feb. 3.

Airman assigned to the Logistics Readiness Squadron and the Force Support Squadron participated in the exercise conducted by the Wing Inspector General team.

Subject matter experts from the Wing Inspection Team, safety and emergency management personnel assisted with the exercise.

The exercise simulated a chemical attack in a forward location, testing the effectiveness of services and small air terminal personnel in managing casualties.

“The functional exercise is targeted to a smaller footprint to maximize the effectiveness of the training event,” said Maj. Christopher Tusing, 167th AW director of inspections.

When the Air Force Inspection System was fielded, there was a shift away from operational readiness exercises and inspections; however efforts are being made to refocus on what is now being called full-spectrum readiness.

“Incremental exercises will transition the wing back to an operational readiness mindset,” Tusing said.

Several small exercises are planned at the wing over the next few months which will lead up to a large scale exercise planned for June. Then the wing will build upon that training for another large scale exercise next year.

“As a wing, we are committed to a robust training cycle while continuing our operational C-17 missions and member deployments,” said Col. Shaun Perkowski, 167th AW commander.

The IG and WIT use Air Force standards and instructions to evaluate the effectiveness of the participants in the exercise.

The success of the event, according to Tusing, can be measured by the esprit de corps that comes with training opportunities that have the entire wing pulling in the same direction.

“That is worth its weight in gold,” said Tusing.