WVANG Airmen swap units for weekend training

Master Sgt. Raymond Franze, left, a fuels management specialist for the 167th Airlift Wing, explains how to use a fueling truck at the Martinsburg, W.Va. air base, to Staff Sgt. Ryan Harmon and Airman 1st Class Richard Ahart, both fuels specialists for the 130th Airlift Wing, April 7. The 167th and the 130th Logistics Readiness Squadrons swapped ten Airmen over the April unit training assembly to afford them new training opportunities. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Emily Beightol-Deyerle)

Master Sgt. Raymond Franze, left, a fuels management specialist for the 167th Airlift Wing, explains how to use a fueling truck at the Martinsburg, W.Va. air base, to Staff Sgt. Ryan Harmon and Airman 1st Class Richard Ahart, both fuels specialists for the 130th Airlift Wing, April 7. The 167th and the 130th Logistics Readiness Squadrons swapped ten Airmen over the April unit training assembly to afford them new training opportunities. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Emily Beightol-Deyerle)

MARTINSBURG, W.Va. --

Ten West Virginia Air National Guardsmen swapped units for April’s unit training assembly as an opportunity to train on systems and equipment not used at their home unit.

Five Airman assigned to the 167th Logistics Readiness Squadron, at the Martinsburg, W.Va. air base spent their drill at the 130th AW in Charleston and five Airmen assigned to the 130th LRS came to the 167th AW.

“This weekend, we’re hosting our second [personnel swap] with a mix of our small air terminal and logistics plans personnel down at the 130th AW and a team of their POL (Petroleum, Oils, Lubricants) troops are here for drill,” said Major Christopher Tusing, 167th Logistics Readiness Squadron commander.

Tusing said 1st Lt. Kevin Hurlbrink, the 167th small air terminal officer in charge, socialized the idea with the 130th LRS leadership last summer while Hurlbrink was assisting with an inspection there.

Airmen are trained on everything needed to do their mission at home station but don’t have access to train for some things they may encounter at a deployed location, Hurlbrink explained. With different airframes and missions at each wing, numerous training opportunities are available to the Airmen in the state.

“The bones were already there,” Hurlbrink said. “We already have travel available with the Charleston to Martinsburg flight each drill and rooms are already reserved. This is a cost effective way to satisfy training requirements and it’s a great opportunity for us to learn from each other and build more bridges.”

The logistics squadrons are hoping to make this a quarterly event with no more than 10 Airmen from each wing participating each time.

“A small footprint like this makes it easier to offset manning and fiscal constraints, and any time we can get the two wings to collaborate, train and work together it's a win for the state,” Tusing said.